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Portrait photo of Tom Kelly
Location
509R College of Nursing
Phone
859-323-5206
Email
thkelly@uky.edu

As the Associate Dean for Research, Thomas H. Kelly, PhD, oversees the development of the College of Nursing’s research portfolio. Responsibilities include increasing research productivity, promoting collaborations and research centers, promoting competitiveness and compliance, encouraging faculty professional growth, and leading, directing and supporting all activities related to research initiatives with in the College of Nursing. Dr. Kelly assumed the role of associate dean for research in Spring 2012. He is the Robert Straus Professor and Vice-Chair of the Department of Behavioral Science in the College of Medicine; Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, Director of Research Education, Training and Career Development for the Center for Clinical and Translational Science; and a member of the Center for Drug Abuse Research. Dr. Kelly is a clinical behavioral pharmacologist with over 30 years of research and training experience in the experimental analysis of drug-behavior interactions with an emphasis on individual differences in drug abuse vulnerability. He has been continuously funded by NIH since receiving an NRSA F32 award in 1984 and has been a member of multiple NIH and VA Study Sections and for several years served as a regular member of the NIDA K study section, reviewing NIDA’s “K” and “T” training grant applications. He serves as the Interim Chair of the Department of Behavioral Science in the College of Medicine and as PI of theKL2 program, and Director of Workforce Development for the Center for Clinical and Translational Science. Dr. Kelly has more than 100 peer-reviewed publications, served on over 40 graduate dissertation committees. 

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Education

  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, VAMC/Louisiana State University School of Medicine, 1986
  • PHD, University of Minnesota, 1983
  • BA, College of St. Thomas, 1978

Interests

  • Drug behavior interactions
  • Individual differences in drug abuse vulnerability